Getting started with WebRTC on iOS

Hangouts does it. Facebook Messenger does it. We at appear.in do it. We all use WebRTC for client to client video conversations in our iOS apps, and so can you! In addition to being an open web standard, WebRTC is an open-source project with high-level API implementations for both iOS and Android.

In this blog post we will investigate how to get started building WebRTC into your iOS app. We will use the native libraries provided by the WebRTC Initiative, but you can check out the OpenWebRTC project as well. We will not go through how you set up a call using a signaling mechanism, but instead highlight what similarities and differences iOS has over the implementation in browsers. As you will see, the APIs for iOS parallel those for the web. If you are looking for a more basic introduction to WebRTC, I can highly recommend Sam Dutton’s Getting started with WebRTC. The code in this article does not represent a complete working application, so I also recommend taking a look at the WebRTC team’s reference implementation, AppRTCDemo.

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Thomas Bruun

Thomas started playing with WebRTC while working on his master thesis in 2013, where he managed to use the technology to perform phone calls from the browser. When the appear.in project was handed over from the interns, Thomas was quick to secure a place on the team. Originally a Python guy in university, he has moved on to embrace JavaScript. Currently juggling iOS, backend, web frontend and anything else that grabs his attention.

Twitter - GitHub

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Introduction to WebRTC on Android

WebRTC has been heralded as a new front in a long war for an open and unencumbered web, and is seen as one of the most important innovations in web standards in recent years. WebRTC has allowed web developers to add video chat or peer to peer data transfer inside their web apps, all without complex code or expensive infrastructure. Supported today in Chrome, Firefox and Opera, with more browsers on the way, it has the capability to reach billions of devices already.

However, WebRTC suffers from an urban myth: WebRTC is just for the browser. In fact, one of the most important things about WebRTC is the fact that it allows for full interoperability between native and web apps alike. Few take advantage of that fact.

In this blog post we will investigate how you can get started with building WebRTC into your Android apps, using the native libraries provided by the WebRTC Initiative. We will not be going through how you set up a call using a signalling mechanism, but instead highlight what similarities and differences Android has over the implementation in browsers. As you will see, the APIs for Android parallel those for the web. If you are looking for a more basic introduction to WebRTC, I can highly recommend Sam Dutton’s Getting started with WebRTC.

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Dag-Inge Aas

Developer Advocate at appear.in. He is the youngest and most enthusiastic member of the team. He is an idealist at heart, and has previously been the Head of IT for the biggest international student festival in the world. He enjoys talking (sometimes perhaps a bit too much), and especially in front of a willing crowd. Can often be seen roaming the candy cabinet at work.

Twitter - GitHub

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